Man who sold water, chapatis to pay school fees graduates from University

– A young man who sold chapatis, carried luggage for women from the market and sold water to sustain himself in school finally graduated from university
– During his time in the university, he would wake up very early in the morning to sell water before going to class or leave class immediately and head back home to do his business
A young graduate identified as Sammy Maina has narrated the numerous challenges he went through to raise school fees for his university education.
How Sammy Maina paid his school fees
In an exclusive interview with TUKO.co.ke, the 25-year-old, who is the sixth born in a family of nine, shared he is the only one among his siblings who managed to get past Class Eight education.
“I started my primary school in 2004 and finished in 2011. I passed well but we never had cash to take me to high school. So I had two options, to either repeat school or go to a school I was not admitted to.
“So I got a scholarship from the Henry Wanyoike Foundation and they educated me through high school. I went to one day school called Rungiri where I got a B plain,” he said.
Back in high school, he used to help his father sell water after school to raise more money at home. In September 2016, he joined TUK university, where he was admitted by the university placement board to study Bachelor of Technology in Industrial and Applied Chemistry.
“While on campus, I used to carry my books and sell water. When I get some free time, I would then read. Then my dad gave me one cart (mkokoteni) and I went to Kikuyu with it. I hustled like no man’s business,” he added.
Through his business, he bought five other carts but later sold one. He then started renting them out and charging Ksh 100 per cart.
There were days he never used to get anyone to rent his carts, but there were days he did good business with them. Maina was a regular student, so that means his schools fees for the whole year was never more than KSh 30k.
“I used to wake up very early and sell the water before the class starts and then go back home and change and go to class. I would have days when classes started at 9am so that I would have an easy time.
In the evening, I would rush home, change, go make chapatis or carry goods for people from the markets or peel potatoes for people who have restaurants,” he added.
The 25-year-old stated that street life taught him that he could do anything and be flexible to take up any job.
He still cuts vegetables for people and maintains that his business is still ongoing, and thanks to it and a campaign he participated in, he built his mother a small house.
Maina’s motivation
“I am the first one of my mother’s kids to finish class eight. Those older than me have no education whatsoever, some do not even know how to write their name. My mother looks at me as her only hope because of the struggle she’s gone through to see me get through school,” he said.
Maina graduated from TUK on Friday, July 31, with Second Class honours.